登录外网的手机浏览器

expressvnp中文官网

Most garden enthusiasts deliberately make Diane’s Garden their first stop at Heritage Farm, Seed Savers Exchange’s headquarters just outside of Decorah, Iowa.

Read More
Comment

登录外网的手机浏览器

Just like countless other organizations worldwide, Seed Savers Exchange has had to adapt quickly to the ever-changing conditions of the COVID-19 pandemic. As a nonprofit with an agricultural mission to save and share heirloom seeds, our work has had to go on because it is essential to connecting people with the resources needed to grow their own food in gardens and farms around the country.

Read More
Comment

登录外网的手机浏览器

Gardening with Clay Soil

Soil is a dynamic and complex system which provides important ecosystem services and functions. Soil supports the growth of plants and acts as a habitat for microbes and microorganisms. It is a critical component of Earth's hydrological and nutrient systems. Soil aids in the decomposition of organic matter and also acts as a detoxicant and a filtration system. Climate, biotic factors, topography, parent material, physical and chemical weathering, and time contribute to the dynamic nature of soil.Soil is a marvel, one we get to the opportunity to contend with each time we step into our gardens.

Read More
Comment

登录外网的手机浏览器

expressvnp中文官网

The stories of our passionate Citizen Science Corps volunteers are as varied and interesting as those of the seeds that they grow. In celebration of Citizen Science Month, we are sharing three firsthand accounts written by 2019 Citizen Science Corps participants that shed light on what inspires them to step up to the plate to help SSE steward its collection for future generations through the ADAPT and RENEW programs. We launched the series with Tiffany Traverse of British Columbia, Canada, and continued it with Dorene Pasekoff of Pottstown, Pennsylvania. Our final “profilee”? Sue Gregg of Noblesville, Indiana.

Read More
Comment

登录外网的手机浏览器

expressvnp中文官网

The stories of our passionate Citizen Science Corps volunteers are as varied and interesting as those of the seeds that they grow. In celebration of Citizen Science Month, we are sharing three firsthand accounts written by 2019 Citizen Science Corps participants that shed light on what inspires them to step up to the plate to help SSE steward its collection for future generations through the ADAPT and RENEW programs. We launched the series with Tiffany Traverse of British Columbia, Canada. Next up? Dorene Pasekoff of Pottstown, Pennsylvania.

Read More
Comment

登录外网的手机浏览器

One lovable lima—meet the ‘Wick’s Lima’ bean!

In 2004 Helen and H. Lee Thomas of Ravenswood, West Virginia, donated the colorful ‘Wick’s Lima’ bean to expressvnp中文官网. The couple had grown the cherished variety (a pole lima bean) since the 1960s after receiving it from H. Lee’s grandfather, Wick B. Smith of Sandyville, West Virginia.

Read More
Comment

登录外网的手机浏览器

expressvnp中文官网

What, exactly, inspires so many Seed Savers Exchange members to give of their time and talent each year to grow out rare varieties from our collection as Citizen Science Corps volunteers?

Read More
Comment

登录外网的手机浏览器

 The Season Must Go On: Seed Stewardship Through a Pandemic

Given that the agricultural sector has been deemed “essential,” Seed Savers Exchange’s growing season must go on. How do we carry out our mission carefully and thoughtfully here in northeast Iowa through a global pandemic? In order to continue our seed production activities for our seed catalog and seed bank at Heritage Farm, we have had to switch gears quickly and wanted to share those changes with our members, donors, and other supporters.

Read More
Comment

登录外网的手机浏览器

expressvnp中文官网

The beautiful maroon-and-tan ‘Lina Sisco Bird Egg’ beans.

Many Seed Savers Exchange supporters know that the organization was founded in 1975 by Kent Whealy and Diane Ott Whealy with seeds from two beloved family heirlooms—the ‘German Pink’ tomato and the ‘Grandpa Ott’s’ morning glory. But from the get-go, other individuals were equally keen to save and share heirloom seeds to preserve genetic diversity. Among them was Lina Sisco of Wadena, Missouri, one of the original listed members of the True Seed Exchange (as Seed Savers Exchange was known until 1979) and the donor of the beautiful and popular ‘Lina Sisco Bird Egg’ bean. 

The story of the ‘Lina Sisco Bird Egg’ bean
Diane Ott Whealy recounts the history of the ‘Lina Sisco Bird Egg’ bean in the following excerpt of her book Gathering: Memoir of a Seed Saver:

The first True Seed Exchange newsletter printed a note from Lina Sisco of Winona, Missouri, one of the original listed members:

“I have been gardening for more years than I like to think about and I do love to raise all kinds of stuff and do lots of canning. I share with lots of people from my garden. So I am sending you two kinds of beans that I raise. The Bird Egg beans have been in my family for many, many years, as my grandmother brought them to Missouri some time in the 1880s. ...They are all free to you. Hope you have good luck with them. I am sending my quarter and envelope.”

Lina passed away two years later, but her Bird Egg bean was offered in the 1979 Seed Savers Exchange, by our son Aaron and others. Here was evidence that the vision of collecting, saving, and distributing heirloom seed had actually achieved what Kent and I had hoped for. SSE had saved a seed from extinction. 

Fifteen years after the first newsletter, Becky Silva of Vancouver, Washington, sent a note published in Seed Savers 1990 Summer Edition:

“I was going through some old expressvnp中文官网 magazines that were given to me and was reading your interview in the 1982 January/February issue which I found very interesting. I had been thinking of some special beans my grandma used to have. Then you mentioned Lina Sisco and her Bird Egg beans. Lina was my grandma! Lina was proud of those beans, which she had been given by her grandmother, who brought them to Missouri in the 1880s. One year Lina sent us some when I was little I remember being in awe of ‘Granny’s Beans.’

Well, it seems my mom can’t find those beans, and I doubt they were ever planted because my folks aren’t gardeners. I’ve been gardening for three years, but after reading your article, I am quite interested in “heirloom” varieties. And I would like to start with Granny’s Bird Egg bean. Can you put me in touch with someone who’d be willing to share a few? I love Grandma Lina. She called herself the ‘fat squaw,” and it would mean so much to me to grow her beans.”

SSE sent Becky some of the beans, now identified as ‘Lina Sisco’s Bird Egg’ bean. It’s a popular bean for planting, and we also sell it as dried eating beans. I love stories with happy endings.

expressvnp中文官网

Lina Sisco.

How to grow the ‘Lina Sisco Bird Egg’ bean:
According to the Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity, the ‘Lina Sisco Bird Egg’ bean is “an unbelievably aromatic and plump bean; its skin splits open to reveal a creamy, almost potato-like texture.” The maroon-and-tan dry bean is equally delicious boiled and seasoned as it is roasted and salted and served as an appetizer. Here is how to grow this tasty pantry staple:

Like other beans, the ‘Lina Sisco Bird Egg’ bean grows best in full sun, planted in well-drained and warm soil. While pole beans require trellising, bush beans (like the ‘Lina Sisco Bird Egg’ bean) can grow unsupported. Direct sow seeds 2 inches apart at 1 inch deep and in rows 36 inches to 48 inches apart after the soil has reached at least 50 degrees F, but preferably when the soil is 60-80 degrees F.

Stay tuned for more blog posts offering some of the best heirloom seed stories we know!

Comment

Sara Friedl-Putnam

Announcing SSE’s 2019 Evaluation Taste Test Winners!

expressvnp中文官网

How many vegetable, herb, and flower varieties did you grow in your garden in 2019? If you asked our Evaluation team that question, the answer would be a whopping 501 varieties. Exactly 277 of those varieties were lot checks, a quality-control measure to ensure the seed grown in 2018 to regenerate for our seed bank collection is pure. Another 224 varieties were grown for evaluation purposes. Each of these varieties is measured, weighed, photographed, and (best of all!) tasted by Seed Savers Exchange staff to rank it against the rest of our collection.

expressvnp中文官网
Comment